Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands
written and illustrated by Kate Beaton

 
Katie heads out west to take advantage of Alberta's oil rush-part of the long tradition of East Coasters who seek gainful employment elsewhere when they can't find it in the homeland they love so much. Katie encounters the harsh reality of life in the oil sands, where trauma is an everyday occurrence yet is never discussed. Beaton's natural cartooning prowess is on full display as she draws colossal machinery and mammoth vehicles set against a sublime Albertan backdrop of wildlife, northern lights, and boreal forest. Her first full length graphic narrative, Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands is an untold story of Canada: a country that prides itself on its egalitarian ethos and natural beauty while simultaneously exploiting both the riches of its land and the humanity of its people.


The Queen's Bed: An Intimate History of Elizabeth's Court
by Anna Whitelock

 
Queen Elizabeth I acceded to the throne in 1558, restoring the Protestant faith to England. For over forty years, her bedchamber was the heart of the court. Elizabeth's private life was of public concern. Her body represented the State itself, and her bedfellows were charged with safeguarding both the Queen and her propriety. These women bore witness to the figure beneath the makeup and the raiment, and also to the Queen's rumored dalliances. They were her friends, confidantes, and spies - nobody knew her better. And until now, historians have overlooked them. In The Queen's Bed the historian Anna Whitelock offers a revealing look at the Elizabethan court and the politics of intimacy, dramatically reconstructing the Queen's quarters and the women who patrolled them. With expert research and lively prose, Whitelock weaves a fascinating tale of sex, gossip, conspiracy, and intrigue, brought to life amid the colours, textures, and routines of the court.


The Egypt Game
by Zilpha Keatldy Snyder

 
The first time Melanie Ross meets April Hall, she's not sure they'll have anything in common. But she soon discovers that they both love anything to do with ancient Egypt. When they stumble upon a deserted storage yard behind the A-Z Antiques and Curio Shop, Melanie and April decide it's the perfect spot for the Egypt Game. Before long there are six Egyptians instead of two. After school and on weekends they all meet to wear costumes, hold ceremonies, and work on their secret code. Everyone thinks it's just a game, until strange things begin happening to the players. Has the Egypt Game gone too far?





 

The Good Asian, Vol. 2
by Pornsak Pichetshote
illustrated by Alexandre Tefenkgi

 
Self-loathing Chinese-American detective Edison Hark uncovers the secrets behind the murders terrorizing 1936 Chinatown and their link to his family—but exposing the truth may mean toppling everything he holds dear.








 

Lumberjanes, Vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy
by Noelle Stevenson & Grace Ellis
illustrated by Brooke Allen

 
At Miss Qiunzilla Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet's camp for hard-core lady-types, things are not what they seem. Three-eyed foxes. Secret caves. Anagrams. Luckily, Jo, April, Mal, Molly, and Ripley are five rad, butt-kicking best pals determined to have an awesome summer together... And they're not gonna let a magical quest or an array of supernatural critters get in their way! The mystery keeps getting bigger, and it all begins here.





 

Which Side Are You On
by Ryan Lee Wong

 
Twenty-one-year-old Reed is fed up. Angry about the killing of a Black man by an Asian American NYPD officer, he wants to drop out of college and devote himself to the Black Lives Matter movement. But would that truly bring him closer to the moral life he seeks? In a series of intimate, charged conversations, his mother—once the leader of a Korean-Black coalition—demands that he rethink his outrage, and along with it, what it means to be an organizer, a student, an ally, an American, and a son. As Reed zips around his hometown of Los Angeles with his mother, searching and questioning, he faces a revelation that will change everything.



 

The Trump Tapes: Bob Woodward's Twenty Interviews with President Donald Trump
by Bob Woodward
narrated by Bob Woodward and Donald Trump

 
Featuring more than eight hours of Woodward/Trump conversations, The Trump Tapes is as historically important as the Frost/Nixon interviews. In this up-close, unvarnished self-portrait of Trump and his presidency, listeners will hear Trump as Woodward did: profane, incautious, divisive, and deceptive, but also engaging and entertaining, ever the host and the salesman, trying to sell his presidency to win Woodward over.  In new commentary created exclusively for The Trump Tapes, Woodward at times breaks frame from the interviews to provide essential context or clarification. But for the most part the interviews proceed uninterrupted, fulfilling Woodward’s goal of presenting Trump’s voice and words for the historical record, and offering listeners the chance to hear and judge and make their own assessments.


Rule of Wolves
by Leigh Bardugo

 
As Fjerda's massive army prepares to invade, Nikolai Lantsov will summon every bit of his ingenuity and charm to win this fight, and Zoya Nazyalensky must embrace her powers to become the weapon her country needs, meanwhile Nina Zenik risks discovery and death as she wages war on Fjerda from inside its capital.
 
King of Scars #2





 

The Holiday Trap
by Roan Parrish
 
Greta Russakoff loves her tight-knit family and tiny Maine hometown, but they can't seem to understand what it's like to be a lesbian living in such a small world. When an act of familial meddling goes way too far, she realizes just how desperately she needs space to figure out who she is. Truman Belvedere's heart is crushed when he learns that his boyfriend has a secret life including a husband and daughter. Reeling, all he wants is a place to lick his wounds far, far away from Louisiana. Enter a mutual friend with a life-altering idea: swap homes for the holidays. For one perfect month, Greta and Truman will have a chance to experience a whole new world... and maybe fall in love with the partner of their dreams. But all holidays must come to an end, and eventually these two transplants will have to decide whether the love (and found family) they each discovered so far from home is worth fighting for.


The Sunflower Cast a Spell To Save Us From The Void
by Jackie Wang
illustrated by Kalan Sherrard

 
The poems in The Sunflower Cast A Spell To Save Us From The Void read like dispatches from the dream world, with Jackie Wang acting as our trusted comrade reporting across time and space. By sharing her personal index of dreams with its scenes of solidarity and resilience, interpersonal conflict and outlaw jouissance, Wang embodies historical trauma and communal memory. Here, the all-too-familiar interplay between crisis and resistance becomes first distorted, then clarified and refreshed. With a light touch and invigorating sense of humor, Wang illustrates the social dimension of dreams and their ability to inform and reshape the dreamer's waking world with renewed energy and insight.


Death on the Nile
by Agatha Christie

 
Detective Hercule Poirot is on a journey to Egypt, where the tranquility of a cruise along the Nile is shattered by the discovery that a stylish young woman has been shot.
 
Hercule Poirot #17








 

Muppets in Moscow: The Unexpected Crazy True Story of Making Sesame Street in Russia
by Natasha Lance Rogoff

 
Muppets In Moscow reveals how-in between bombings and political chaos in 1990s Moscow-a team of Russian and American artists, producers, educators, writers, and puppeteers overcame their many differences to create an unprecedented hit in a post-communist era.







 

Alice Guy: First Lady of Film
by José-Louis Bocquet
translated by Edward Gauvin
illustrated by Catel Muller

 
The inspiring story of Alice Guy, the first female movie director in film history, chronicles her contribution to the birth of cinema in France in the late 19th century.








 

BRZRKR, Vol. 2
by Keanu Reeves and Matt Kindt
illustrated by Ron Garney

 
Half-mortal and half-god, cursed and compelled to violence, the man known only as B. begins wandering the world anew. After enduring a series of experiments and missions, B.'s memories of his origins will be finally restored. But what does this revelation mean for his future? Has B. finally found true freedom? Perhaps, but when has the U.S. government ever let their best asset go?





 

The Girl from H.O.P.P.E.R.S.
written and illustrated by Jaime Hernández

 
Collecting the adventures of the spunky Maggie; her annoying, pixie-ish best friend and sometime lover Hopey; and their circle of friends, including their bombshell friend Penny Century, Maggie's weirdo mentor Izzy — as well as the aging but still heroic wrestler Rena Titañon and Maggie's handsome love interest, Rand Race.






 

Lore Olympus: Volume Three
written and illustrated by Rachel Smythe

 
All of Olympus - and the Underworld - are talking about the God of the Dead and the sprightly daughter of Demeter. But despite the rumors of their romance, Hades and Persephone have plenty to navigate on their own. Since coming to Olympus, Persephone has struggled to be the perfect maiden goddess. Her attraction to Hades has only complicated the intense burden of the gods' expectations. And after Apollo's assault, Persephone fears she can no longer bury the intense feelings of hurt and love that she's worked so hard to hide. As Persephone contemplates her future, Hades struggles with his past, falling back into toxic habits in Minthe's easy embrace. With all the mounting pressure and expectations - of their family, friends, and enemies - both Hades and Persephone tell themselves to deny their deepest desires, but the pull between them is too tempting, too magnetic. It's fate.


Babel
by R. F. Kuang

 
Robin Swift, orphaned by cholera in Canton, is brought to London by the mysterious Professor Lovell. There, he trains for years in Latin, Ancient Greek, and Chinese, all in preparation for the day he'll enroll in Oxford University's prestigious Royal Institute of Translation - also known as Babel. Babel is the world's center for translation and, more importantly, magic. For Robin, Oxford is a utopia dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge. But knowledge obeys power, and as a Chinese boy raised in Britain, Robin realizes serving Babel means betraying his motherland. As his studies progress, Robin finds himself caught between Babel and the shadowy Hermes Society, an organization dedicated to stopping imperial expansion.



 

Believing Me: Healing from Narcissistic Abuse and Complex Trauma
by Ingrid Clayton

 
What if emotional abuse is so hidden, its effects remain unchallenged for decades, masquerading as personal failings? Believing Me is an emotionally gripping memoir that gives language to the hidden and ineffable nature of childhood trauma and how it can imprint on a person, resulting in fractured self-esteem, addictions, perfectionism and a string of abusive relationships. Ingrid Clayton had been in the pursuit of healing for a lifetime, including becoming a clinical psychologist and trauma therapist, but she never fully understood what she was healing from. Growing up in a fog of gaslighting made her question her reality. It wasn't until she sat next to Dr. Bessel van der Kolk (The Body Keeps the Score) as he shared a case study so similar to her life, that a seed was planted. By reclaiming her story, Ingrid transcended the role of healer into someone becoming healed, showing us what real healing looks like in the process.


Under Lock & Skeleton Key
by Gigi Pandian

 
After a disastrous accident derails Tempest Raj's career, and life, she heads back to her childhood home in California to comfort herself with her grandfather's Indian home-cooked meals. Though she resists, every day brings her closer to the inevitable: working for her father's company. Secret Staircase Construction specializes in bringing the magic of childhood to all by transforming clients' homes with sliding bookcases, intricate locks, backyard treehouses, and hidden reading nooks. When Tempest visits her dad's latest renovation project, her former stage double is discovered dead inside a wall that's supposedly been sealed for more than a century. Fearing she was the intended victim, it's up to Tempest to solve this seemingly impossible crime. But as she delves further into the mystery, Tempest can't help but wonder if the Raj family curse that's plagued her family for generations - something she used to swear didn't exist - has finally come for her.
 
Secret Staircase #1


The Marriage Portrait
by Maggie O'Farrell

 
Florence, the 1550s. Lucrezia, third daughter of the grand duke, is comfortable with her obscure place in the palazzo: free to wonder at its treasures, observe its clandestine workings, and to devote herself to her own artistic pursuits. But when her older sister dies on the eve of her wedding to the ruler of Ferrara, Moderna and Regio, Lucrezia is thrust unwittingly into the limelight: the duke is quick to request her hand in marriage, and her father just as quick to accept on her behalf. Having barely left girlhood behind, Lucrezia must now make her way in a troubled court whose customs are opaque and where her arrival is not universally welcomed. In the court’s eyes, she has one duty: to provide the heir who will shore up the future of the Ferranese dynasty. Until then, for all of her rank and nobility, the new duchess’s future hangs entirely in the balance.


It Won't Always Be Like This
written and illustrated by Malaka Gharib

 
It's hard enough to figure out boys, beauty, and being cool when you're young, but even harder when you're in a country where you don't understand the language, culture, or religion. Nine-year-old Malaka Gharib arrives in Egypt for her annual summer vacation abroad and assumes it'll be just like every other vacation she's spent at her dad's place in Cairo. But her father shares news that changes everything: He has remarried. Over the next fifteen years, as she visits her father's growing family summer after summer, Malaka must reevaluate her place in his life. All that on top of maintaining her coolness! Malaka doesn't feel like she fits in when she visits her dad - she sticks out in Egypt and doesn't look anything like her fair-haired half siblings. But she adapts. She learns that Nirvana isn't as cool as Nancy Ajram, that there's nothing better than a Fanta and a melon-mint hookah, that the desert is most beautiful at dawn, and that her new stepmother, Hala, isn't so different from Malaka herself.


My Father's Dragon
by Ruth Stiles Gannett

 
Elmer Elevator runs away with an old alley cat to rescue a flying baby dragon being exploited on a faraway island. With the help of two dozen pink lollipops, rubber bands, chewing gum, and a fine-toothed comb, Elmer disarms the fiercest of beasts on Wild Island.
 
My Father's Dragon #1





 

Uglies
by Scott Westerfeld

 
Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can't wait. In just a few weeks she'll have the operation that will turn her from a repellent ugly into a stunning pretty. And as a pretty, she'll be catapulted into a high-tech paradise where her only job is to have fun. But Tally's new friend Shay isn't sure she wants to become a pretty. When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world — and it isn't very pretty. The authorities offer Tally a choice: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. Tally's choice will change her world forever...
 
Uglies #1



 

Nerd: Adventures in Fandom from This Universe to the Multiverse
by Maya Phillips

 
From the moment Maya Phillips saw the opening scroll of Star Wars, Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, her childhood changed forever. Her formative years were spent loving not just the Star Wars saga, but superhero cartoons, anime, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Harry Potter, Tolkien, and Doctor Who - to name just a few. As a critic at large at The New York Times, Phillips has written extensively on theater, poetry, and the latest blockbusters - with her love of some of the most popular and nerdy fandoms informing her career. Now, she analyzes the mark these beloved intellectual properties leave on young and adult minds, and what they teach us about race, gender expression, religion, and more - especially as fandom becomes more and more mainstream.


Graceling
by Kristin Cashore

 
In a world where some people are born with extreme and often-feared skills called Graces, Katsa struggles for redemption from her own horrifying Grace, the Grace of killing, and teams up with another young fighter to save their land from a corrupt king.
 
Graceling #1




 

Begin Again: James Baldwin's American and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own
by Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.

 
Mixing biography - drawn partially from newly uncovered interviews - with history, memoir, and trenchant analysis of our current moment, Begin Again is Glaude's attempt, following Baldwin, to bear witness to the difficult truth of race in America today. It is at once a searing exploration that lays bare the tangled web of race, trauma, and memory, and a powerful interrogation of what we all must ask of ourselves in order to call forth a new America.



 

Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times
by Kathering May

 
Sometimes you slip through the cracks: unforeseen circumstances like an abrupt illness, the death of a loved one, a break up, or a job loss can derail a life. These periods of dislocation can be lonely and unexpected. For May, her husband fell ill, her son stopped attending school, and her own medical issues led her to leave a demanding job. Wintering explores how she not only endured this painful time, but embraced the singular opportunities it offered. A moving personal narrative shot through with lessons from literature, mythology, and the natural world, May's story offers instruction on the transformative power of rest and retreat.




 

Sula
by Toni Morrison

 
Nel Wright has chosen to stay in the place where she was born, to marry, raise a family, and become a pillar of the black community. Sula Peace has rejected the life Nel has embraced, escaping to college, and submerging herself in city life. When she returns to her roots, it is as a rebel and a wanton seductress. Eventually, both women must face the consequences of their choices. Together, they create an unforgettable portrait of what it means and costs to be a black woman in America.





 

All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley's Sack, a Black Family Keepsake
by Tiya Miles

 
Sitting in the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is a rough cotton bag, called "Ashley's Sack," embroidered with just a handful of words that evoke a sweeping family story of loss and of love passed down through generations. In 1850s South Carolina, just before nine-year-old Ashley was sold, her mother, Rose, gave her a sack filled with just a few things as a token of her love. Decades later, Ashley's granddaughter, Ruth, embroidered this history on the bag--including Rose's message that "It be filled with my Love always." Historian Tiya Miles carefully follows faint archival traces back to Charleston to find Rose in the kitchen where she may have packed the sack for Ashley. From Rose's last resourceful gift to her daughter, Miles then follows the paths their lives and the lives of so many like them took to write a unique, innovative history of the lived experience of slavery in the United States.


Good Grief: On Loving Pets, Here and Hereafter
by E. B. Bartels

 
E.B. Bartels has had a lot of pets: dogs, birds, fish, tortoises. As varied a bunch as they are, they've taught her one universal truth: to own a pet is to love a pet, and to own a pet is also - with rare exception - to lose that pet in time. But while we have codified traditions to mark the passing of our fellow humans, most cultures don't have the same for pets. Bartels takes us from Massachusetts to Japan, from ancient Egypt to the modern era, in search of the good pet death. We meet veterinarians, archaeologists, ministers, and more, offering an idiosyncratic, inspiring array of rituals - from the traditional (scattering ashes, commissioning a portrait), to the grand (funereal processions, mausoleums), to the unexpected (taxidermy, cloning). The central lesson: there is no best practice when it comes to mourning your pet, except to care for them in death as you did in life, and find the space to participate in their end as fully as you can.


 

Doughnuts and Doom
written and illustrated by Balazs Lorinczi

 
Being a teenage witch - or rock star - is tougher than it looks! But maybe enemies can become friends... or more? Flying brooms and electric guitars set hearts aflame in this fantastically fizzy graphic novel. When Margot meets Elena, emotions run high, magic is in the air, and doughnuts ...float? One is a stressed out witch trying to get her potions business off the ground, the other is a struggling rock musician whose band is going nowhere. Neither of them are having a good time! No wonder when they first meet things quickly escalate from words to literal sparks flying. Could this be the start of a delicious new relationship... or is a bad-luck curse leading them to certain doom?


Men We Reaped
by Jesmyn Ward

 
In five years, Jesmyn Ward lost five men in her life, to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that can follow people who live in poverty, particularly black men. Dealing with these losses, one after another, made Jesmyn ask the question: why? And as she began to write about the experience of living through all the dying, she realized the truth - and it took her breath away. Her brother and her friends all died because of who they were and where they were from, because they lived with a history of racism and economic struggle that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships. Jesmyn says the answer was so obvious she felt stupid for not seeing it. But it nagged at her until she knew she had to write about her community, to write their stories and her own.


The Stars Did Wander Darkling
by Colin Meloy

 
In a sleepy seaside town in 1980s Oregon, Archie Coomes and his friends are convinced that an unknown evil has been unleashed on the town after his dad's construction company opens the cliff beneath the old Langdon place - widely believed to be haunted - and the adults in town begin to act strangely.






 

Saga, Vol. 10
by Brian K. Vaughan
illustrated by Fiona Staples

 
At long last, Hazel and her star-crossed family are finally back, and they've made some new... friends? This collection features the latest six chapters of the most epic adventure in comics, including the series' double-sized first issue back from hiatus. Collects SAGA #55-60.






 

The Golden Compass
by Philip Pullman
narrated by a full cast

 
Lyra is rushing to the cold, far North, where witch clans and armored bears rule. North, where the Gobblers take the children they steal - including her friend Roger. North, where her fearsome uncle Asriel is trying to build a bridge to a parallel world. Can one small girl make a difference in such great and terrible endeavors? This is Lyra: a savage, a schemer, a liar, and as fierce and true a champion as Roger or Asriel could want - but what Lyra doesn't know is that to help one of them will be to betray the other.
 
His Dark Materials #1


Crumbs
written and illustrated by Danie Stirling

 
In a very special town, there's an even more unusual bakery with a selection of baked treats hand-crafted to help your dreams come true. For Ray, a quiet young woman with special powers of her own, the order is always the same: a hot tea with a delicious side of romance. When Ray meets Laurie, the kind barista who aspires to be a professional musician, she gets a real taste of love for the first time. But even with a spark of magic, romance isn't so simple. Both Ray and Laurie are chasing their own dreams and even when Ray starts to see the future, she cant predict her fate with Laurie.



 

The Golden Enclaves
by Naomi Novik

 
The one thing you never talk about while you're in the Scholomance is what you'll do when you get out. Not even the richest enclaver would tempt fate that way. But it's all we dream about: the hideously slim chance we'll survive to make it out the gates and improbably find ourselves with a life ahead of us, a life outside the Scholomance halls. And now the impossible dream has come true. I'm out, we're all out - and I didn't even have to turn into a monstrous dark witch to make it happen. So much for my great-grandmother's prophecy of doom and destruction. I didn't kill enclavers, I saved them. Me and Orion and our allies. Our graduation plan worked to perfection: We saved everyone and made the world safe for all wizards and brought peace and harmony to all the enclaves everywhere. Ha, only joking! Actually, it's gone all wrong. Someone else has picked up the project of destroying enclaves in my stead, and probably everyone we saved is about to get killed in the brewing enclave war. And the first thing I've got to do now, having miraculously gotten out of the Scholomance, is turn straight around and find a way back in.
 
Scholomance #3


The Pallbearers Club
by Paul Tremblay

 
A volunteer pallbearer for poorly attended funerals, Art Barbara, a seventeen-year-old loner in the 1980s, meets a cool girl who has an obsessive knowledge of strange, terrifying things that he tries to make sense of years later while writing a book that she begins making edits to.






 

All That Is Wicked: A Gilded-Age Story of Murder and the Race to Decode the Criminal Mind
by Kate Winkler Dawson

 
Edward Rulloff was a brilliant yet utterly amoral murderer - some have called him a "Victorian-era Hannibal Lecter" - whose crimes spanned decades and whose victims were chosen out of revenge, out of envy, and sometimes out of necessity. From his humble beginnings in upstate New York to the dazzling salons and social life he established in New York City, at every turn Rulloff used his intelligence and regal bearing to evade detection and avoid punishment. He could talk his way out of any crime... until one day, Rulloff's luck ran out. By 1871 Rulloff sat chained in his cell - a psychopath holding court while curious 19th-century mind hunters tried to understand what made him tick. Each one thought he held the key to understanding the essential question: is evil born or made?